Character analysis on “A Rose for Emily”

Character analysis on “A Rose for Emily”

The short story “A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner shows the way an overly protected love could obliterate one’s life. Emily Grierson, the chief character of the narrative, first gives the reader notion of acting brutal and even crazy. But after a keen look into her character, I feel that the reader could almost comprehend the way and why she happened to be the way she was. Emily was very reliant on her father. She has grown up her entire life in the same home, possibly with the same butler, and with her fathers company. These made her to stay secluded and away from reality. Emily is an inert character since; her personalities which include being silent, brutal and even crazy do not change all through the story. However, there are several parts of the story that indicate that Emily was a energetic character. Throughout the piece Emily has a metamorphosis mentally, socially and physically. For example, she changes mentally following her father's demise but the town’s folk did not notice it. Emily grows to be depressive; which directs her to her own decay. People thought that she had a sturdy personality for the reason that she dominated the neighbors. Furthermore, the townspeople perceived Emily as a risk-free secluded woman who could be pitied because of her lonesomeness.   However, toward the end of the story her evil nature is unraveled.

Emily lives for several years as a loner; she withdraws from her entire community to stay in seclusion. Miss Emily tries to eliminate herself from society by virtue of her actions her actions. "After her father's death she went out very little; after her sweetheart went away, people hardly saw her at all.  The death of her father and the shattered relationship with her boyfriend added to her attempt to live in seclusion. In addition to that, though her father was responsible for her becoming a hermit, her pride also contributed to her seclusion. "None of the young men were quite good enough for Miss Emily and such. Her pride made her to keep of from socializing with the other members of the town

The narrator portrays also Emily as a monument, but at the same time she is pitied and in most cases irritating, too demanding to live life on her own terms. She is the subject matter of all hearsay and speculation; the townspeople chuckle their tongues at the fact that she acknowledge Homer’s attentions without firm wedding plans. After she buys the poison, the townspeople conclude that she will kill herself.

Generally, she is spoken of from a distance by the community; she is a flat and static character, someone who exists as more of a "tradition", or small town legend, than an actual human being. Apart from Emily as the main character, we have other characters in the story that include among others; Homer, whom given the information in the story he isn't a very sympathetic character. This is partly because the town, as represented by the narrator, doesn't like him. Jeffersonian doesn’t like him because he's a rough-talking, charismatic northerner and an overseer in town working on a sidewalk-paving project. Emily's father is the guy with the gigantic horsewhip. As per the story, he is portrayed as being a very selfish man in a very selfish society. Old lady Wyatt is Emily's great-aunt. Before her death, according to the townspeople, old lady Wyatt is "completely crazy" She seems to be in the story to suggest that insanity runs in Emily's family.